The Best 0% APR Credit Cards of 2020
Illustration: Sarah MacReading
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The Best 0% APR Credit Cards of 2020

  • We've updated the rates and marketing information in this guide.

A 0% APR credit card can come in handy when you need to buy something expensive and you’d rather avoid depleting your savings in one fell swoop. And in tough economic times like the coronavirus crisis, it can function as an interest-free loan or, with a balance transfer, help you pay off existing credit card debt—as long as you pay off your balance when the introductory period ends. 

Credit cards we reviewed
You need to know
Annual fee
Intro bonus
Regular APR
You need to knowBest 0% APR offer with cash back rewards
Annual fee$0
Intro bonus
$150
Regular APR14.99% - 23.74% variable
Learn More
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You need to knowBest if you need 20 months to pay for a big purchase
Annual fee$0
Intro bonus
N/A
Regular APR13.99% - 23.99% variable
Learn More
We don't earn a commission on this offer.
You need to knowBest cash back card if you’re a Bank of America customer
Annual fee$0
Intro bonus
$200
Regular APR13.99% - 23.99% variable
Learn More
We don't earn a commission on this offer.
You need to knowGreat for gas station and supermarket rewards
Annual fee$0
Intro bonus
$150
Regular APR12.99% - 23.99% variable
Apply Now
Apply now for this Partner Offer on American Express’s secure website.
You need to knowNo balance transfer fee and 15 months to pay down your debt
Annual fee$0
Intro bonus
N/A
Regular APR14.99% - 23.74% variable
Learn More
We don't earn a commission on this offer.
You need to knowIf you want a balance transfer card that also offers spending rewards
Annual fee$0
Intro bonus
10,000 points
Regular APR12.99% - 23.99% variable
Learn More
We don't earn a commission on this offer.

The research

Note: We generally don’t recommend using the same credit card for both new purchases and balance transfers (your goal with a balance transfer should be to pay off debt, not add to it).

You generally need good or excellent credit to get approved for one of these cards. They’re typically reserved for folks with credit reports free of serious negative marks (such as a bankruptcy, a collections account, or a late payment).

 

Our pick for a 0% APR card with staying power

Chase Freedom Unlimited® Credit Card

The Unlimited really shines if you have the Chase Sapphire Reserve, as your 1.5 points per dollar spent could be worth 2.25 points when combined with the Reserve and redeemed for travel.

What we love

1.5% cash back on everything you buy, plus 15 months of 0% interest on purchases and balance transfers (then a variable APR of 14.99% - 23.74%), makes it valuable long after you’ve paid off your debt.

  • A $150 intro bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first three months
  • No penalty APRs or revoked 0% APR offers if you miss a payment (though you'll still incur late fees and it may hurt your credit)
  • 5% cash back on Lyft rides between now and March 2022

What we don’t love

1.5% cash back is good but not great, so the card is less valuable if you aren’t using the intro APR offer or pairing your rewards with another complementary Chase card.

  • 3% foreign transaction fees
Chase Freedom Unlimited® Credit Card
See Rates & Fees. Terms Apply.
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Product details have been collected independently by Wirecutter and are accurate as of 4/2/2020. Learn More.

Annual Fee

$0

Regular APR

14.99% - 23.74% variable

Intro Bonus

$150

Recommended Credit

Good to excellent

Unlike some cards with lengthy 0% promo periods, the Chase Freedom Unlimited isn’t one you want to throw away once the 15-month 0% APR offer is over. It has no annual fee plus a decent cash back rate (unlimited 1.5% on all purchases), which can be worth even more when combined with rewards from certain other Chase cards, like the Chase Sapphire Reserve.

Read our review of the Chase Freedom Unlimited.

 

Best if you need 20 months to pay for a big purchase

U.S. Bank Visa® Platinum Card

You have 20 billing cycles of 0% APR on purchases and balance transfers, but you’ll pay a 3% balance transfer fee if you move existing debt to this card.

What we love

20 billing cycles of 0% APR on purchases and balance transfers is one of the longest no-interest periods we’ve seen.

  • Once the 0% APR offer ends, your lowest possible APR (variable rate of 13.99% - 23.99%) is relatively affordable
  • No penalty APRs

What we don’t love

The card has no spending rewards, so you likely won’t have much use for it after you pay off your balance.

  • The highest possible APR you could be assigned for when the intro period is over is pretty harsh
  • A 3% balance transfer fee (or a minimum of $5)
U.S. Bank Visa® Platinum Card
See Rates & Fees. Terms Apply.
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Product details have been collected independently by Wirecutter and are accurate as of 3/16/2020. Learn More.

Annual Fee

$0

Regular APR

13.99% - 23.99% variable

Intro Bonus

N/A

Recommended Credit

Good

If you know you need 18 months or more to pay off your new purchase, few cards offer as much in potential savings as this one.

The U.S. Bank Visa Platinum belongs to a small group of credit cards that are great for both purchases and balance transfers made within 60 days of opening your account (though it does charge a 3% balance transfer fee), which also earns it a spot in our guide to the best balance transfer cards. There’s no penalty APR, and its ongoing variable APR of 13.99% – 23.99% once the intro period ends is pretty low—a bonus if you still have debt left over.

For a limited time, the card gives you 20 billing cycles (each of which is typically a month) to pay off purchases and balance transfers with zero interest. This is the longest 0% APR period of any credit card we recommend. The biggest drawback to the U.S. Bank Visa Platinum is that it doesn’t offer any spending rewards, so you may want to use the card to pay for your big purchase and then stick it in a drawer.

 

Best cash back card if you’re a Bank of America customer

Bank of America® Cash Rewards Credit Card

0% APR for 15 billing cycles on purchases and balance transfers made in the first 60 days (then a variable APR of 13.99% - 23.99%). Plus, the bonus rewards will keep this card at the top of your wallet for years to come.

What we love

3% cash back on a category of your choice (either gas, online shopping, dining, travel, drug stores, or home improvement/furnishings) is great, but it can get even better. Once your account balance hits $20,000 or more, you’ll be eligible to get bonus rewards through BofA’s Preferred Rewards program.

  • $200 bonus after you spend $1,000 on purchases in your first 90 days
  • You earn 2% at grocery stores and wholesale clubs (or 3.5% for the highest tier of BofA’s Preferred Rewards program customers)

What we don’t love

In order to get bonus rewards, you need to have at least $20,000 saved with Bank of America. To qualify for the highest 5.25% rate, you need to park a whopping $100,000.

  • You receive 3% and 2% bonus rewards only on the first $2,500 in combined purchases every quarter, then 1%
Bank of America® Cash Rewards Credit Card
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Annual Fee

$0

Regular APR

13.99% - 23.99% variable

Intro Bonus

$200

Recommended Credit

Good to excellent

 

Great for gas station and supermarket rewards

Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

The Blue Cash Everyday offers bonus rewards at US gas stations, US supermarkets, and select US department stores in one card, for no annual fee.

What we love

You earn 3% at US supermarkets up to the first $6,000 in annual spending (then 1%), and an unlimited 2% at US gas stations and select US department stores.

  • $150 statement credit after you spend $1,000 on purchases in your first three months
  • There’s no need to opt in to cash back categories
  • The 0% intro APR offer on purchases for 15 months can help if you need to buy something you can’t afford to pay off in full (then 12.99% - 23.99% variable)

What we don’t love

The bonus cash back you can earn on groceries is capped at $6,000 in annual spending, and what counts as a US supermarket is irritatingly narrow.

  • 2.7% foreign transaction fees
  • The balance transfer offer comes with a 3% balance transfer fee (or a minimum of $5)
Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express
See Rates & Fees. Terms Apply.
Apply Now
Apply now for this Partner Offer on American Express’s secure website.

Annual Fee

$0

Regular APR

12.99% - 23.99% variable

Intro Bonus

$150

Recommended Credit

Good to excellent

Both of these cards serve two purposes: giving you ample time (15 billing cycles) to pay off a big purchase before interest kicks in, while also letting you earn rewards on everyday spending categories.

The Bank of America Cash Rewards credit card earns 2% cash back at grocery stores and wholesale clubs and 3% on a bonus category of your choice (either gas, online shopping, dining, travel, drug stores, or home improvement and furnishings), up to the first $2,500 in combined spending each quarter. After that—and for all other purchases—you earn 1%. You also get a $200 bonus after you spend $1,000 on purchases in your first 90 days.

Read our review of the Bank of America Cash Rewards.

The Blue Cash Everyday Card from American Express, meanwhile, earns 3% cash back at US supermarkets (up to the first $6,000 in annual spending, then 1%). Keep in mind that the American Express definition of supermarkets isn’t synonymous with “all grocery stores,” so this card is for you only if you shop at chains such as Publix, Whole Foods, Safeway, and Kroger (rather than small grocers or big warehouse clubs). It also has a sign-up bonus, but it’s not quite as good as that of the Bank of America Cash Rewards: You earn $150 back as a statement credit after you spend $1,000 in the first three months.

Read our review of the Blue Cash Everyday.

 

No balance transfer fee and 15 months to pay down your debt

Chase Slate®

Chip away at your credit card debt with this valuable balance transfer card without drowning in fees or interest.

What we love

We’re big fans of this card’s nonexistent rewards since you have to focus solely on exorcising your credit card debt.

  • 15 months of 0% interest on purchases and balance transfers made within 60 days of opening your account (then the APR jumps to a variable 14.99% - 23.74%)
  • No balance transfer fee for transfers made within 60 days of opening your account (you’re charged a 5% fee, or a minimum of $5, after that)

What we don’t love

If you need more than 15 months of 0% interest to pay off your debt, you’ll find better options elsewhere.

  • 3% foreign transaction fees
  • If you’re only using this card for a 0% purchase APR offer, the lack of rewards makes it unappealing, as you could get cash back for the same purchase through cards with similar APR offers
Chase Slate®
See Rates & Fees. Terms Apply.
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Product details have been collected independently by Wirecutter and are accurate as of 4/19/2020. Learn More.

Annual Fee

$0

Regular APR

14.99% - 23.74% variable

Intro Bonus

N/A

Recommended Credit

Good to excellent

The Chase Slate credit card offers 0 interest and no balance transfer fees when moving debt from non-Chase cards (if you transfer your balance within the first 60 days of opening your account). You then have 15 months to repay it—as well as pay off any new purchases—before interest kicks in, after which your APR jumps to 14.99% – 23.74%.

That said, putting new debt on the Chase Slate can muddle your math if you made a plan to pay off your transferred balance in full before the 0% APR offer expires. Plus, the card’s terms and conditions state that your credit limit could be as low as $500, which likely isn’t helpful if you hope to transfer more.

Read our review of the Chase Slate.

 

If you want a balance transfer card that also offers spending rewards

Amex EveryDay® Credit Card

No balance transfer fees plus 0% APR for 15 months if you transfer your balance within 60 days of getting the card. Plus, some small spending rewards might make this card useful in the future.

What we love

If you transfer your balance within 60 days of becoming a cardholder and pay it off in 15 months, you could potentially pay off your debt without incurring any costs.

  • 15 months of 0% APR if you make the balance transfer within 60 days of opening your account (then a variable 12.99% - 23.99%)
  • Earn 2x Membership Rewards (MR) points on US supermarkets on up to $6,000 in spending per year, and 1x MR point on all else
  • A 10,000 MR points welcome bonus after you spend $1,000 within three months of opening your account

What we don’t love

If you need more than 15 months to pay off your debt, you can do better on other credit cards.

  • 2.7% foreign transaction fees
  • Other no annual fee cards with 0% APR offers have even better spending rewards
  • The trifecta of a 0% APR on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, no balance transfer fees, and spending rewards might sound tempting, but it can also be incredibly tough to manage without getting yourself into more debt
Amex EveryDay® Credit Card
See Rates & Fees. Terms Apply.
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Product details have been collected independently by Wirecutter and are accurate as of 3/18/2020. Learn More.

Annual Fee

$0

Regular APR

12.99% - 23.99% variable

Intro Bonus

10,000 points

Recommended Credit

Good to excellent

The Amex Everyday Credit Card is the only card we recommend that has the following trifecta of features: no interest on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, no balance transfer fees, and spending rewards—making it one of our top picks for best 0% APR balance transfer credit cards as well.

All of that could be a blessing, if you’re certain you can pay off your balances within 15 months. But it could also be a curse: Mixing balance transfers and new spending can get complicated, and if you’re not vigilant about tracking what you owe and when you owe it before interest kicks in, you might end up adding to your debt rather than paying it down.

However, if you can confidently chip away at the balance you transfer, once your debt is gone you’re left with a card that earns rewards: 2x points on your first $6,000 in annual purchases at US supermarkets (then 1x point), and 1x point on everything else. It’s not the best rate you can get at supermarkets, but it’s pretty good, especially when you consider that the card also effectively gives you a 15-month interest-free loan.

Read our review of the Amex EveryDay.

What does 0% APR on a credit card mean?

With most credit cards, if you make a purchase and don’t pay it off in full by the end of your billing cycle, you pay interest on whatever balance remains (as opposed to deferred interest cards, where you pay interest on the full balance from the original purchase date).That means you end up paying more to the bank than what your purchase originally cost you.

But if you make a purchase with a 0 interest credit card, you won’t pay any interest until the end of the card’s 0% APR intro period (though you must pay off your balance in full by then, if you want to avoid interest after that).

You usually see two types of 0% APR cards:

  1. A 0% purchase APR card is one that won’t charge you interest on any new purchases for a set period of time.
  2. A 0% balance transfer card is one that lets you move current IOUs from an existing credit card and won’t charge you interest on the transferred balance for a set period of time.

Introductory purchase APR offers, which we’re primarily discussing in this guide, apply only to new purchases you make on that credit card. If you plan to transfer existing credit card debt to a card with no interest, check out our guide to the best balance transfer credit cards.

0% intro purchase APR offers versus balance transfers: What’s the difference?

Although a 0% purchase APR and a 0% balance transfer APR are features you can often find on a single credit card, they aren’t the same thing.

Balance transfer cards allow you to move your current credit card debt from one (or more) cards to one that offers a temporarily lower APR, potentially saving you money on interest. They’re a good bet if you want help repaying an existing IOU while minimizing interest and fees.

Some zero interest credit cards offer no-interest periods for both balance transfers and purchases. You’re effectively getting an interest-free loan, but you’re also risking digging yourself deeper into debt, so be cautious when putting new purchases on a card that you just used for a balance transfer.

And that’s not the only risk you take when you use intro APR offers on purchases and balance transfers simultaneously. With some cards, the promo period for purchases expires before that of balance transfers, which could leave you paying unintended interest.

What determines the APR on a credit card?

The APR you qualify for depends on many factors, including your credit history and income. In general, the higher your credit score and income, the lower the APR you’re assigned. Increasing your credit score is likely easier than increasing your income, so focus on building your credit if you want to qualify for a card with a lower APR.

And yes, your credit card’s APR—for both new purchases and balance transfers—can change. Here are some reasons why:

  • The promo period is up.
  • Your card’s APR is a variable rate (that means it’s tied to an index, often the prime rate, and can rise or fall in tandem with that index).
  • You pay your credit card bill late, after which you’re hit with a penalty APR.

What is the average APR on a credit card?

In 2018, the average APR for general-purpose credit cards was 20.3%, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s 2019 Consumer Credit Card Market report (PDF).

General-purpose cards are accepted by a wide variety of merchants, while private-label cards can usually be used only at one retailer. (The Target REDCard is an example of a private-label card.) Such cards typically have much higher APRs: In 2018, the average APR for private-label credit cards was 26.4%.

How to compare two cards with a 0% APR offer

When comparing multiple cards with 0% APR offers, ask yourself the following questions:

  • How much time do I need to pay off my new purchase? If the answer is 15 months or fewer, any of our recommendations will serve you—all of them offer at least 15 months of 0% APR to pay off your purchase in full. If you need more time, there are a handful of cards with longer intro periods; the longest we found is 18 months.
  • If I need more time than what the card offers, what will my APR be after the intro period ends? Though you probably won’t know your assigned APR before you actually get the card, compare the APR ranges of your top picks and select the one that has the lowest possible APR after the promo period ends.
  • What about rewards or intro bonuses? If you still haven’t narrowed down your choices, we consider rewards to be a tiebreaker. If you’re deciding between two cards that each have 15-month periods of 0% interest, for example, pick the one that throws in a $150 intro bonus—that’s money in your pocket (assuming you don’t rack up interest charges later). Also, consider factors like customer service support and ease of use, such as the usability of the card issuer’s mobile app.

What if you need more than 18 months to pay off your purchase?

If you need more than 18 months (which is the longest 0 interest credit card that we found) to pay off a purchase, you have to pay interest on whatever balance remains.

Say you’re eyeing a $1,600 washer-dryer combo, and you can commit to making monthly payments of $75. This simple formula lets you calculate how much debt you’re likely to have left over after the promo period ends:

Purchase price - (monthly payment × number of 0% APR months) = remaining balance after the promo period ends

In this scenario, that would look like:

$1,600 - ($75 × 18) = $250

In other words, interest starts accruing on that $250 once your promo period ends (and continues until your balance is paid in full).

Tons of APR calculators can help you figure out exactly how much you’ll pay in interest. Let’s pretend your APR after the 0% period ends is 20%. Assuming you continue to make $75 payments (which means you need four additional months to pay off your remaining balance), you end up paying about $8 in interest. You’re probably not going to sweat over $8.

What if your debt is much bigger than that, though? For example, say you really want to purchase a $2,500 wall oven. If you pay $75 each month for the duration of your 18-month 0% APR period, your remaining balance is $1,150. But if you continue making $75 payments after that, you end up paying a weighty $170 in interest (assuming your APR is 20%).

What’s the longest 0% purchase APR period out there?

The card with the longest 0% purchase APR period we found is the U.S. Bank Visa Platinum Card, which gives you 20 billing cycles of no interest on purchases and balance transfers, then a variable APR of 13.99% – 23.99%.

Typically, the longer the card’s 0% APR period, the fewer other perks and rewards the card offers. That’s the case with the U.S. Bank Visa Platinum: Other than a generous 0% APR period, its features are pretty bare-bones.

What is the minimum payment on a zero interest credit card?

Most cards require you to make some sort of minimum monthly payment. The amounts vary by card as well as the size of your balance, so check your card’s terms. With our top pick, the Chase Freedom Unlimited, you have to pay at least $35 (or the card’s full balance, if it’s less than $35) every billing cycle.

Some cards revoke your 0% APR offer completely if you fail to make your minimum monthly payment on time.

What happens if you carry a balance on your credit card after the 0% interest period expires?

On a 0 interest credit card, you start paying interest on your remaining balance once your promo period ends.

What’s in it for the banks?

“Zero-percent APR offers are a marketing tactic, and the banks are betting against you,” Wendy De La Rosa, co-founder of Common Cents Lab and a behavioral scientist at Stanford University, said in an interview. “They lure you in because in the long run, you’re a profitable customer.”

Here are a couple of ways banks make money on cardholders with 0 interest credit cards:

  • You don’t pay your balance in full by the end of the promo period, so you and wind up paying a high variable APR on your remaining balance.
  • You make a late payment. In this situation, you’re likely subject to a late fee (which can be as much as $40). Some banks may also impose a steep penalty APR.

How can you avoid paying interest on a 0% APR card?

Make a plan for tackling your debt. Let’s revisit the scenario in which you buy that $1,600 washer-dryer combo with your Chase Freedom Unlimited, which gives you 15 months of 0% APR on purchases.

Divide that purchase price by the length of the 0% APR period to determine the minimum payment you need to make each month to avoid interest. That formula looks like this:

Purchase price ÷ number of 0% APR months = minimum monthly payments to avoid paying interest

In this example, that would look like:

$1,600 ÷ 15 = $106.67

You could plan to pay off your balance in just 12 months, in which case you need to increase your monthly payments to $133.34. That way, you get rid of your debt even faster.

What are your options for a 0% APR card if you have fair or poor credit?

In general, your options are few and far between: Most 0% APR cards require you to have good to excellent credit. Your best bet is to focus on rebuilding your credit score before you apply for these types of cards.

How does a 0% intro APR offer affect your credit score?

As part of your credit card application, the issuer reviews your credit history and score. This step is known as a hard inquiry, and it could cause your credit score to dip temporarily, though not by much: According to FICO, a hard inquiry decreases a person’s credit score by an average of five to 10 points. Hard inquiries stay on your credit report for two years, but they usually affect your credit scores for only a few months.

The other factor to consider that may hurt your credit is the potential change to your credit utilization ratio, or the total of how much you currently owe across all of your accounts divided by the total amount of your credit limit. Experts recommend that you owe no more than 30% of your total credit limit or of an individual card’s limit. High utilization may indicate to lenders or creditors that you’re having trouble managing your finances.

Say you have a $4,000 credit limit on your new card, but you’re using some of it to pay for a $1,300 MacBook Pro. Your credit utilization ratio, not accounting for other credit lines you may have, is 32.5% (meaning you’ve used up 32.5% of your card’s credit limit):

(1,300 ÷ 4,000) × 100 = 32.5

But it’s not necessarily a permanent problem. Assuming you pay down your balance every month (and all else remains equal), your credit utilization ratio should decrease, which can help your credit score.

You should take advantage of a 0% APR card only if:

  • You want to minimize the interest you pay on a big purchase that you can’t afford to pay for outright. You may also have existing credit card debt that you want to move over to a card with a 0% APR offer.
  • You have a credit score that’s at least good (a FICO score of 670-plus [PDF]). These cards can be tough to get approved for.
  • You can make (and stick to) a budget. If you need more time than the promo period to pay off your debt, you should have a plan in place and be aware of how much interest you could end up paying.
  • You can pay off your purchase in full before the intro period ends, if you want to avoid paying any interest at all.

Keep in mind that 0% interest for a year isn’t an excuse to buy things you can’t pay off. You should avoid these cards if:

  • You might be tempted to overspend and live beyond your means.
  • You don’t have good or excellent credit. Cards with benefits such as an extended interest-free period are typically reserved for folks with great credit and a credit report free of serious negative marks (such as a bankruptcy, a collections account, or a late payment).
  • You’re not planning a big purchase; instead, you want to pay down existing credit card debt for a period of 0% APR. If that’s you, check out our guide to balance transfer credit cards, which delves deeper into the fees, interest rates, and length of 0% APR periods for those types of cards.

To determine our picks, we reviewed cards with two types of people in mind: those who want the longest possible 0% APR period, and those who want a no interest credit card to pay off a big purchase but are also looking for value beyond the 0% intro offer.

We narrowed down our picks to cards that have 0% purchase APR offers of at least 15 months, to help ensure you have ample time to pay off your debt before interest kicks in.

We also included some of the best credit cards that offer a 0% APR period on balance transfers as well as purchases. That way, if you pay off your balance within the promo period, you could potentially avoid paying any fees or interest to the bank.

Read more in our full methodology.

  • ABOC Platinum Rewards Mastercard®
  • American Express Cash Magnet® Card
    (Read our full Amex Cash Magnet Review.)
  • Amex EveryDay® Credit Card
    (Read our full Amex Everyday Review.)
  • Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express
    (Read our full Amex Blue Cash Everyday Review.)
  • BankAmericard® Credit Card
    (Read our full Bankamericard Review.)
  • Bank of America® Cash Rewards Credit Card
    (Read our full Bank of America Cash Rewards Review.)
  • BB&T Bright Credit Card
  • BB&T Spectrum Cash Rewards Credit Card
  • BBVA ClearPoints Credit Card
  • BECU Cash Back Visa®
  • BECU Visa
  • BMO Harris Bank Platinum Rewards Mastercard®
  • BMO Harris Bank Premium Rewards Mastercard®
  • Quicksilver® from Capital One®
  • SavorOne® Rewards from Capital One®
  • Chase Freedom® Credit Card
    (Read our full Chase Freedom Review.)
  • Chase Freedom Unlimited® Credit Card
    (Read our full Chase Freedom Unlimited Review.)
  • Chase Slate®
    (Read our full Chase Slate Review.)
  • Citi® Diamond Preferred® Credit Card
  • Citi Simplicity® Card
    (Read our full Citi Simplicity Review.)
  • CorTrust Bank CorPlatinum Visa Credit Card
  • Discover it® Cash Back
  • Discover it® Chrome Gas & Restaurants
  • Fifth Third Truly Simple® Credit Card
  • Gesa Credit Union Diamond Cash Back Credit Card
  • Gesa Platinum Card
  • HSBC Gold Mastercard® credit card
  • Johnson Bank Visa® Platinum Card
  • Johnson Bank Visa Signature® Real Rewards Card
  • Navy Federal cashRewards Cash Back Credit Card
  • Navy Federal Platinum Credit Card
  • OCCU Nice Perks® Visa® Card
  • OCCU Nice® Platinum Visa® Credit Card
  • PNC Core® Visa® Credit Card
  • RBC Visa Signature Black
  • RBC Visa Signature Black Plus
  • State Farm® Rewards Visa®
  • SunTrust Cash Rewards Credit Card
  • Synovus Rewards Visa® Credit Card
  • Synovus Cash Rewards Visa® Credit Card
  • Synovus Classic Visa® Credit Card
  • U.S. Bank Visa® Platinum Card
  • Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® Card
  • Wells Fargo Platinum Card
  • Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card
  • Wells Fargo Rewards® Card
  • Wells Fargo Visa Signature® Card
  • WSECU Low Rate Visa
  • WSECU Platinum Rewards Visa
  • Zions Bank Amazing Cash® Credit Card
  • Zions Bank AmaZing Rate® Low Rate Credit Card
  • Zions Bank AmaZing Rewards® Credit Card

Blue Cash Everyday® Credit Card rates and fees

  1. Wendy De La Rosa, co-founder of Common Cents Lab and behavioral scientist at Stanford University, phone interview, December 6, 2018

  2. Nils Devine, cardholder, phone interview, December 10, 2018

  3. Meredith Reilly, spokesperson for Capital One, email interview, December 10, 2018

About your guide

Sally French

Sally French

Staff Writer

Sally French is a staff writer at Wirecutter, covering personal finance. Previously she spent five years writing for MarketWatch, where she reported on everything from comparing meal kit costs to detailing her own personal experience buying a home in San Francisco. Her personal finance stories have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and many other publications. You can find her on LinkedIn.

Editorial note: The evaluations of financial products in this article are independently determined by Wirecutter and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any third party.

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